Prescott Farmers Market News and Events

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Oct 29

PFM newsletter 10/29

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From the Land

The Prescott Farmers Market and CSA Newsletter

Contact us at pccsa@prescott.edu or  info@prescottfarmersmarket.org

O: 928/350.1401          C928/713.1227 

Like us on Facebook: “Prescott Farmers Market and CSA

On the web: www.prescott.edu/csa or www.prescottfarmersmarket.org  


 

in this issue

 
 




when local food just isn't enough

cherry tomatoes, recipes and more!

 

fresh this week

 

cherry and heirloom tomatoes, potatoes, carrots and other root veggies, salad mix, all kinds of winter squash and pumpkins, and onions to store for the winter!

Plus:

 

live music with Traditional Blends

 

cooking demo with Chef Todd

 

guest artists Kelly Bunnell and Emma Phipps

 

Customer Appreciation Day - stop by the Information Booth for pumpkin pie and coffee! 

 

LAST MARKET DAY - don't miss it! 

veg of the week

Cherry tomatoes: Solanum lycopersicum


This hybrid of the traditional tomato has been cultivated at least since the early 1800's, and most likely originated separately in Peru, northern Chile, and Egypt. Our modern varieties have been bred for sweetness, , size, shape, and sturdy skins. The first records of cherry tomatoes in the United States are from 1916, and the first recipes from the 1960's, when they gained immense popularity.


Cherry tomatoes are most often eaten raw in salads, on bruschetta, as garnish, or with dip as an appetizer. They are not often cooked or used in sauces, though Creole dishes like jambalaya and gumbo prove an exception! They are best eaten within a day or two of being ripe, and refrigerating is not recommended. 


Tomatoes are low in sodium, cholesterol, and saturated fats. They are rich in  vitamin E, thiamine, niacin, vitamin B6, folate, magnesium, phosphorus, copper. dietary fiber, vitamin A and C, vitamin K, potassium, and manganese.

upcoming events

PRESCOTT FARMERS MARKET

October 29Live music from Traditional Blends

Guest mixed media artists Emma Phipps and Kelly Bunnell

plus: customer appreciation day &

last day of the market!

7:30-noon

Yavapai College


SUSTAINABLE FOOD PRESENTATIONS

experiential series of events and lectures with Prescott College student Wren Myers. See attached flier for more info.

- A Sense of Self

Prescott College Chapel

October 27, 5-7pm

- A Sense of Place

Highlands Center

November 5, 10am-12pm

- A Sense of Community

Highlands Center

November 12, 10am-12pm

- A Sense of Responsibility

Prescott College Chapel

November 17, 5-7pm


 

29 October 2011

 
 



when local just isn't enough

by Annie Teegarden


I love supporting local farmers, I love knowing that my money is helping out a local farm stay in business.  But I often ask myself, what about those other products that I love and can’t live without that cannot be sourced locally?  Every morning I start my day with a cup of coffee, and my dinners are often flavored with spices from other countries.  So, I started doing a little research on the “fair trade” and “organic" certifications.  If I can’t know the farmer, then at least I can rely on  specific agricultural and trade standards that benefit the farmer and the land.         

 


The Fair Trade (FT) certification ensures that the farmer gets a fair price for their product, farm workers have a safe working environment and a decent wage, there is a direct trade between the farmers and merchant, some money gets reinvested in community development, and that the farms are environmentally friendly (non-GMO, few if any agrochemicals, and generally sustainable farming practices).  Fair trade most often refers to coffee, chocolate, tea, herbs and spices, but can also apply to fruits and vegetables, grains, cotton, beans, oil seeds and wine.  But, like most food related certifications, this one comes with its own set of controversies.  While we pay upwards of $10 for a pound of free-trade coffee, the farmer gets paid maybe only $1.50 for that pound - but even then this is better than non-FT.  Lucky for us, we have access here in Prescott through the farmers market and the CSA store, to excellent coffee that we know is grown well. Cafe de Dona Ella coffee is a step better: direct-tradeManuel Santana and his family grow the coffee on their plantation in El Salvador, and he directly imports it and sells it through the Prescott and Flagstaff Farmers Markets, as well as the Prescott and Flagstaff CSA stores.

 

The organic certification maintains that the farms do not use toxic chemicals (fertilizer, pesticides, antibiotics, GMO’s), the farm land has not been used with any of the above chemicals for a minimum of three years, that it must have sustainable fertility and other farming practices, all farm inputs must be natural, that sustainable soil practices are utilized, and that each farm is inspected yearly.  I see the organic certification as a nice baseline when I am shopping.  It tells me that I can count on certain standards when I can’t find a product grown locally. 

 

So, when local just is not an option for those must-have food items, I find that these certifications are helpful when navigating the supermarket.  While there are arguments in favor and in opposition to both of these certifications, at the very least these standards tell us that people and the environment are being treated in an ethical manner.  

 

http://www.learnvest.com/living-frugally/when-is-it-worth-buying-organic/

 

http://transfairusa.org/resource-library/faq

 

http://www.ams.usda.gov/AMSv1.0/nop

 

 

 


recipes…

 

walla walla onion and cherry tomato bruschetta

Adapted from thepurloinedrecipe.com

  • 20 cherry tomatoes, cut in half
  • 1 medium Walla Walla onion, sliced thin
  • 15 kalamata olives, pitted and finely chopped
  • 2 T finely chopped fresh basil
  • 1 T capers
  • 1/2 C olive oil
  • 2 t balsamic vinegar
  • 1 clove garlic, finely chopped
  • freshly ground black pepper
  • 8 slices bread, your choice (1/2" thick, 4" wide)
  • 4 oz mascarpone cheese

 

Mix together tomatoes, onions, olives, basil, and capers in a small bowl. Whisk together the olive oil, balsamic vinegar, garlic and black pepper. Pour over the tomato onion mixture and toss. Set aside.


Brush the bread with olive oil and grill over medium heat, turning once, until toasted, 2-3 minutes total. Divide the mascarpone evenly among bread slices, spreading it with a knife. Spoon the tomato onion mixture over the mascarpone, dividing evenly. Serve at room temperature. 

 

 


creamy carrot soup with cherry tomato & corn salsa

adapted from oprah.com
  •  
    • 3 C grated carrot
    • 1 T raw sesame tahini
    • 2 T lemon juice
    • 1/2 t paprika
    • 1 t sea salt
    • 20 cherry tomatoes, quartered
    • 1 ear corn, kernels removed from cob
    • 1 2-inch cucumber, small diced
    • 2 T fresh coriander, minced
    • 1 jalapeno chili pepper, minced (remove seeds if you prefer your salsa less spicy)
    • 2 T lime juice
    • 1/2 t sea salt
  • To make soup: Simply combine all the ingredients in a blender, adding about 3 cups water and blending until smooth and creamy.

    To make salsa: Combine all the salsa ingredients and set aside to marinate for at least half an hour before serving. 

    Serve the soup garnished with a scoop of salsa.


    Variations:
    • In place of tahini, you could add an avocado or 1 cup coconut milk to give a creamy consistency. You could also add 1/3 cup raw cashews.
    • You could make the soup spicier by adding some Tabasco or some fresh or dried chili pepper. Fresh ginger or other spices could be added to suit your personal taste.


pasta with spiced leek, butternut squash, & cherry tomatoes
Adapted from cookitsimply.com

 

  • 1 lb leeks, cut into 3/4" slices
  • 1 lb butternut squash, peeled, de-seeded and cut into 3/4" chunks
  • 3 T curry paste
  • 2 t olive or vegetable oil
  • 1 lb cherry tomatoes
  • 1 lb dried pasta of your choice
  • 2 C white sauce (see below)
  • 4 T chopped fresh coriander leaves
Preheat the oven to 400°F.

Bring a large saucepan of water to the boil, add the leeks and cook for 2 minutes. Add the butternut squash and cook for another 2 minutes. Drain in a colander.

Mix the curry paste with the oil in a large bowl. Toss the leeks and butternut squash in the mixture to coat thoroughly.

Transfer the leeks and butternut squash to a non-stick baking tray and roast in the oven for 10 minutes until golden brown. Add the tomatoes and roast for an additional 5 minutes.

Meanwhile, cook the pasta according to the instructions on the packet and drain.

Put the sauce into a large saucepan and warm over a low heat. Add the leeks, butternut squash, tomatoes and coriander and stir in the warm pasta. Mix thoroughly and serve.

for the white sauce

  • 2 C milk 
  • 4 T cornflour
  • 3 t mustard powder
  • 5 small bay leaves 
  • 1 medium onion
  • 1/4 C freshly grated Parmesan or Pecorino cheese
To make the sauce, put the milk into a small non-stick saucepan with the flour, mustard, onion and bay leaf. Whisk over a medium heat until thick. Remove from the heat, discard the onion and bay leaf and stir in the cheese. Set aside, stirring occasionally, to prevent a skin forming.
Oct 21

PFM newsletter 10/22

Posted by: pfmadmin |
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From the Land

The Prescott Farmers Market and CSA Newsletter

Contact us at pccsa@prescott.edu or  info@prescottfarmersmarket.org

O: 928/350.1401          C928/713.1227 

Like us on Facebook: “Prescott Farmers Market and CSA

On the web: www.prescott.edu/csa or www.prescottfarmersmarket.org  


 

in this issue

 
 


 

the illusion of cheap food

parsnips, recipes and more!

 

fresh this week

 

parsnips, radishes, potatoes, butternut, spaghetti, and acorn squash, carrots, green onions, bok choy, and so much more!

 

Plus:

 

live music from touring farmers market musicians Coco and Lafe! www.cocolafe.com

 

guest ceramics artist Skyler Jess 

veg of the week

Parsnips: Pastinaca sativa

Often mistaken by sight as white carrots, the parsnip holds its own in the vegetable world. They are sweeter than carrots, as well as maintaining higher nutrient content. They are rich in fiber, folic acid, calcium and potassium, as well as vitamins B1, B2, B3, C, iron and zinc. Parsnips are often described as tasting like butter, butterscotch, or even cardamom. They are also closely related to parsley, which can be bred to grow a thick root!


Though they are edible raw, parsnips are most often cooked, whether by boiling, roasting or frying. They are an excellent addition to soups and stews, roasted root vegetables, casseroles, or fried into crisps. They can also be used in soups, straining out the solid bits and leaving a lightly-flavored broth that will thicken slightly because of the starch from the parsnip.


Parsnips originated in the Mediterranean, and have been cultivated since Roman times. They originally grew very small - about the size of a baby carrot - but it was discovered that they grow larger the farther north they are cultivated. They were introduced to North America in the mid-1800's though it was rapidly replaced in popularity by the potato. 

upcoming events

PRESCOTT FARMERS MARKET

October 22Live music from Coco and Lafe - check out their music at http://cocolafe.com/

Guest ceramics artist Skyler Jess

October 29: customer appreciation day &

last day of the market!

7:30-noon

Yavapai College


SUSTAINABLE FOOD PRESENTATIONS

experiential series of events and lectures with Prescott College student Wren Myers. See attached flier for more info.

- A Sense of Self

Prescott College Chapel

October 27, 5-7pm

- A Sense of Place

Highlands Center

November 5, 10am-12pm

- A Sense of Community

Highlands Center

November 12, 10am-12pm

- A Sense of Responsibility

Prescott College Chapel

November 17, 5-7pm


 

22 October 2011

 
 


the illusion of cheap food

 

America prides itself on its ability to produce cheap food, and lots of it. Because of our high production-based food system, Americans spend an average of 9.8% of their income (after taxes), the lowest of any nation at any time in history. But though it appears we don’t spend that much money on food because of the sales price, we make up for it in “hidden costs” that compensate for the cheap food that we are consuming. This is a richly complex subject, but it is important to realize that "cheap food" is not as cheap as we think it is, because of its effects on our health, our food economy, the environment, and on society. Here are some basic explanations of the hidden costs of our cheap food system.


The first hidden cost of cheap food is found in the pharmacy aisle: the money spent on remedies to ease stomachs, like antacids, laxatives or Tums. By eating real food, most of us can skip the cost of needing anything from the pharmacy and feel great. Real food, rich in fiber and naturally-occurring vitamins and mineral, comes complete with all the stuff your body needs to digest and process it in a healthy way. When eating real food all the time, we eliminate the long term health care costs that are also hidden within our food system.

 

The second hidden cost of cheap food is the farm bail outs and subsidies that our government pays for with tax dollars. In a roundabout way, we are paying to make commodity food items like corn and soybeans inexpensive for the producer and the consumer, resulting in feedlots and highly processed foods. 

 

The third hidden cost is cheap farm labor. Farm work is hard, seasonal and does not pay a comfortable wage. These folks who work the long, strenuous hours so we can buy cheap food in turn need financial assistance from the government in the form of welfare or seasonal unemployment. Our culture has strayed so far from farm work that many U.S citizens leave these jobs to immigrant labor. 

 

The fourth hidden cost comes out in the money that gets spent on fixing the damages that large scale agriculture cause. Heavy fertilizer and pesticide use, over-tilling, and over-use result in eroded, toxic soil that is then dumped onto land or in water. Taxpayer’s money is spent on environmental clean-up so we can in turn drink the water or use that land. 

 

The fifth and last hidden cost is food quality. Buying and consuming cheap food means that we are forfeiting our right to good quality food. Cheap produce has lost its flavor due to hybrids meant to travel far and store long and dependence on out-of-season produce, breads are airy and light with little nutritional value, fillers are added to foods to substitute for real food ingredients, making the ingredient list longer and unreadable. This cost is difficult to put a dollar amount on, but I think it speaks for itself in the quality of the food we are eating.  


This is why we choose to support local farmers who grow real food. The farms that support and are supported by the Prescott Farmers Market and CSA produce healthy food, picked at the height of freshness, that provides us quality nutrition. Our farmers care about the land, because they know their livelihood depends on its health. And t
hey pay a fair wage to the workers, and have a true connection with their community through which people can interact directly with their food and those that grow it. Local food consumers may pay a higher price initially, but it is well justified by better personal health and directly contributing to a healthy food economy.

 


For more information:


http://www.cookingisfun.info/saturdayletter/2003/12/27/cheap-food-is-an-illusion/

 

Wayne Roberts, No Nonsense Guide to Global Food.

 

http://www.ers.usda.gov/AmberWaves/September08/Findings/ PercentofIncome.htm 

 

 


recipes…

 

roasted parsnips

Adapted from simplyrecipes.com


  • 1 1/2 pounds of parsnips, peeled and cut into 2 1/2 inch batons
  • 4 teaspoons of extra virgin olive oil
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 1/3 cup of chicken or vegetable stock
  • 3 Tbsp unsalted butter, softened
  • 4 teaspoons drained, bottled horseradish (how to make homemade horseradish)
  • 1/2 Tbsp finely chopped flat-leaf parsley
  • 1/2 Tbsp minced chives
  • 1/2 small garlic clove, minced.

 


Pre-heat oven to 400°F. In a large roasting pan, toss the parsnips with the olive oil, salt and pepper. (Use a roasting pan with sides no more than 2 inches high.) Add the broth, cover with aluminum foil and roast, stirring once or twice, until the parsnips are tender and the stock has evaporated or been absorbed, 20-45 minutes (depending on how tender the parsnips are to begin with). Check often to avoid their getting mushy - especially if they are to be reheated later.

Combine the softened butter with the horseradish, parsley, chives and garlic and season with salt and pepper. Toss the warm roasted parsnips with the horseradish-herb butter and serve.

 

 

bok choy and parsnip soup

adapted from sparkpeople.com
  • 2 pounds ground turkey
  • 1 cup diced onion
  • 5 beef bouillon cubes
  • 2 T olive oil
  • 3 C sliced bok choy stalks
  • 3 C chopped boy choy leaves
  • 2 C chopped parsnip
  • 1 T sea salt
  • 1 C diced tomatoes, save juice
  • 1 C acini di pepe (small round pasta)
  • 10 C water
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 2 T crushed rosemary leaves
  • 1 T cilantro
  • 2 cloves crushed garlic
  • 1 T black pepper

You'll need a big pot for this one! 

First, brown your turkey with the onions and then drain. Add the diced tomatoes, juice and all. 

In another pan, cook your minced garlic in 2 T of olive oil until the garlic looks lightly toasted. Add your sliced bok choy with the chopped parsnips and sea salt; cook for about 10 minutes. Then add to the soup pot.

Mix bouillon cubes with 1 cup boiling water until dissolved. Add to pot.

Add remaining 9 cups water, bay leaves, rosemary, cilantro and black pepper. Cook to boiling.

Add acini de pepe and keep at a boil until pasta is cooked, approx. 15 minutes. 

Decrease heat to a simmering temperature and add bok choy leaves. Simmer for as little as 10 minutes or as long as 30 minutes. The longer you simmer, the better your spices can enhance the flavor. 

 


winter squash and parsnip gratin
Adapted from yummly.com


 

  • 1/3 C breadcrumbs
  • 1/4 C fresh parsley, chopped
  • 1/2 t salt
  • 1/4 t dried oregano
  • 1/4 t dried thyme
  • 1/4 t pepper
  • 4 C acorn squash (peeled, cut into cubes, about 1 lb)
  • 2 C butternut squash (peeled, cut into cubes, about 1/2 lb)
  • 2 C parsnips (peeled if necessary, chopped)
  • 1 T olive oil
  • 1/2 C sharp cheddar cheese
  • 1 sprig fresh oregano (optional)
Combine the first 6 ingredients in a large bowl, and stir well. Add squashes, parsnip, and oil, tossing to coat. Spoon squash mixture into a 2-quart casserole coated with cooking spray. Cover and bake at 325° for 1 1/2 hours. Sprinkle with cheese, and bake, uncovered, an additional 15 minutes. Garnish with oregano, if desired.

Use any combination of winter squash to equal 6 C, if desired.
Oct 06

please help with farmers market survey

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Hello Prescott, Prescott Valley and Chino Valley Farmers Market customers! 
 
Two graduate students at ASU are conducting a research study to better understand
consumer perspectives and demographics of farmers’ markets, with the intent of
improving the farmers’ market experience. To thank you for your time spent participating
in the study, they will be holding a raffle for one $100 gift certificate to our local
Prescott, PV, and Chino Farmers Markets! See below for information about how to participate in the brief survey.

Sincerely,
Erin Lingo, Prescott Farmers Market Manager

Our names are Keri Fehrenbach and Carissa Taylor and we are graduate students in
the Hugh Downs School of Human Communication and the School of Sustainability at
Arizona State University under the supervision of Dr. Christopher Wharton in the School
of Nutrition and Health Promotion.

We are conducting a research study that examines consumer perspectives of desired
food-related information, as well as consumer demographics in order to improve
consumer experience at the market.

We are recruiting individuals to fill out an online survey that will take approximately 5-10
minutes to complete. Participation in the study is voluntary and you must be 18 years or
older.

If you have any questions concerning the research study, please email us at
keri.fehrenbach@asu.edu or carissa.taylor@asu.edu.

To access the survey:
Or copy and paste the address: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/HBNHFJT

Please note that this survey will be open for one week. We’ll notify the $100 raffle
winner by November 15, 2011.

Thanks in advance,

Keri Szejda Fehrenbach, M.A.
Carissa Taylor, M.A.
Christopher Wharton, Ph.D.
Oct 06

PFM newsletter 10/7

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From the Land

The Prescott Farmers Market and CSA Newsletter

Contact us at info@prescottfarmersmarket.org or 928/713.1227

Like us on Facebook: “Prescott Farmers Market and CSA

On the web: www.prescottfarmersmarket.org or www.prescott.edu/csa


 

in this issue

 

CSA store

storing vegetables

potatoes, recipes and more!

 

fresh this week

 

carrots, radishes, salad turnips, head lettuce, garlic and onions, purple potatoes, winter squash, and so much more!

 

Plus:

- guest mixed media artist Vanessa Compton - check out her work at www.krinshawstudios.com

- live music from Starvin' Marvin 

veg of the week

Purple Potatoes: Solanum tuberosum 

The potato originated in the Andes of South America, and was first cultivated over 7000 years ago! It then took until the 1570s to reach Europe, where for 200 years it had only limited use, as it was thought of as a food for the "underclass", as well as its membership in the somewhat-poisonous nightshade family.


Potatoes are also related to tomatoes, eggplant, peppers, deadly nightshade, and the infamous datura. And sure enough, the leaves of the potato are poisonous, and when left in sunlight potatoes will turn green and, if eaten, are bitter and can cause illness in humans.    


In all honesty, potatoes have been given a bad rap. Sure, the most common way to eat potatoes in the US is in their deep-fried form as french fries and potato chips, or topped with butter and sour cream, but there is more to the potato than meets the eye. Purple potatoes, specifically, have been found to lower blood pressure and contribute to weight loss. In addition, all pigmented potatoes have been found to lower levels of oxidative stress, inflammation, and blood pressure, all of which are linked to chronic disease. So, whip up one of these salads or soups - and enjoy! Remember, potatoes really do count as part of your daily vegetable requirement!  

upcoming events

PRESCOTT FARMERS MARKET

October 8: Live music from Starvin' Marvin

Guest mixed-media artist Vanessa Compton

October 29: customer appreciation day &

last day of the market!

Every Saturday through October 29, 7:30-noon

Yavapai College


SUSTAINABLE FOOD PRESENTATIONS

experiential series of events and lectures with Prescott College student Wren Myers. See attached flier for more info.

- "The Power of Community" movie, Mariposa Bldg.

October 18 5-7pm

- A Sense of Self

Prescott College Chapel

October 27, 5-7pm

- A Sense of Place

Highlands Center

November 5, 10am-12pm

- A Sense of Community

Highlands Center

November 12, 10am-12pm

- A Sense of Responsibility

Prescott College Chapel

November 17, 5-7pm


 

7 October 2011

 
 

this week in the CSA store...

Don't forget the check our rotating selection of vegetables, dried fruit, pasta, eggs, and other locally produced goodies in the CSA store! All of these items are available for purchase Monday through Friday 8:30am-4:30pm, and until 6pm on Wednesdays! 


storing veggies

Storing vegetables for the short term can seem intimidating, because each item requires slightly different temperature and humidity.  We did a feature on this topic several months ago, but this it is a valuable enough topic to justify revisiting it. So, how do we keep all of our produce at their peak in our refrigerators?  First we must know how each vegetable or fruit must to be stored to maintain optimal storage length. 


Most vegetables (and fruits) like to be stored in a cold and moist environment.  All of our cooking greens, lettuces, root vegetables, peas, sweet corn, apples, grapes, cabbages, broccoli and cauliflower stay fresh longer when kept in the refrigerator with a little moisture.  The ideal storing temperature is 32 degrees, so keeping these vegetables in the refrigerator in bags or Tupperware containers is an excellent way to keep them fresh and crispy.  A quick tip for root vegetables: remove the greens right away before storage because while the whole plant is intact, the greens will continue to send water to the root, making the root wilt and loose its crunch.

 

Vegetables like potatoes, tomatoes, beans, melons, peppers and eggplants should be kept in a moist environment at a warmer temperature (40-50 degrees).  Garlic and onions require a cool (32 degrees) and dry environment, while pumpkins, winter squash and sweet potatoes should have a warm (50-60 degrees) and dry environment.  If you plan to consume these vegetables soon, they can be left out at room temperature but if you would like to keep them a little longer plan to store them away at the appropriate temperature. 


Lastly, it is good to check up on these foods often.  Check to see that they are still crisp, and not rotting.  I find that when my vegetables are hiding away in the refrigerator in plastic bags I need to consciously remember that they are there.  Happy cooking!

 

 


recipes…

 

radish potato salad

Adapted from tasteofhome.com

 


  • 5 medium red potatoes (about 1-1/2 pounds)
  • cup sliced radishes
  • 2 hard-cooked eggs, chopped
  • 3/4 cup mayonnaise
  • 3 tablespoons minced fresh dill or 2 teaspoons dill weed
  • 2 tablespoons cider vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon sugar or honey
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • Dash pepper

 

 

  • Place potatoes in a saucepan and cover with water. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat; cover and cook for 15-20 minutes or until tender. Drain and cool.
  • Peel and cube potatoes; place in a large bowl. Add radishes and eggs. In a small bowl, combine the mayonnaise, dill, vinegar, sugar, salt and pepper. Pour over potato mixture; gently toss to coat. Cover and refrigerate for at least 1 hour. Yield: 4 servings.
  • * this would also be delicious with halved de-seeded Concord grapes!

 

 

 

 

 

balsamic-roasted baby potatoes and carrots

adapted from food.com

lb baby purple potatoes, halved
1/2 lb carrots, cut diagonally
1/2 onion, thinly sliced
cloves garlic, peeled & smashed
3 T balsamic vinegar
2 T butter, melted
sprigs fresh thyme (or 1/2 tsp dried)
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon fresh ground pepper

 

    • Line a large rimmed baking sheet with heavy duty foil.

    • Combine all ingredients in a large bowl. Place on baking dish in a single layer and cover with foil. Roast in a preheated 425F oven for 45 minutes, shaking the pan a few times. Remove foil and roast, uncovered, for another 30 minutes, stirring occasionally, or until veggies are tender & golden.
  •  


    lettuce and potato soup
    Adapted from nytimes.com


     

    1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil

    1 medium onion, chopped

    1 leek, white and light green parts only, sliced and rinsed well

    2 garlic cloves, minced

    1 lb purple potatoes, washed and diced

    6 cups chicken stock, vegetable stock, or water

    A bouquet garni made with a cleaned leek green, a bay leaf and a few sprigs each parsley and thyme, tied together

    Salt to taste

    5 ounces lettuce leaves, washed and coarsely chopped (4 cups)

    Freshly ground pepper

    2 tablespoons chopped flat-leaf parsley or chives for garnish

    Heat the olive oil in a large, heavy soup pot over medium heat and add the onion and leek. Cook, stirring, until tender, about 5 minutes. Add 1/2 teaspoon salt and the garlic and cook, stirring, until the garlic is fragrant, about 1 minute. Add the potatoes, stock or water, and bouquet garni, and bring to a simmer. Add salt to taste, cover and simmer over low heat for 45 minutes.

    Stir in the lettuce leaves and continue to simmer for another 15 minutes. The potatoes should be thoroughly tender and falling apart.

    Using an immersion blender, or in a blender or food processor fitted with the steel blade (working in batches and covering the blender lid or food processor with a kitchen towel to prevent the hot soup from splashing), blend the soup until smooth. If you want a smoother, silkier texture, strain the soup through a medium strainer, pushing it through the strainer with a pestle, spatula, or the bowl of a ladle. Return the soup to the heat, add lots of freshly ground pepper, taste and adjust salt. Heat through and serve, garnishing each bowl with chopped fresh parsley or chives.

    Note: If serving cold, add a dollop of plain yogurt to the garnish.

    Sep 29

    PFM newsletter 9/30

    Posted by: pfmadmin |
    Tagged in: Untagged 


    From the Land

    The Prescott Farmers Market and CSA Newsletter

    Contact us at info@prescottfarmersmarket.org or 928/713.1227

    Like us on Facebook: “Prescott Farmers Market and CSA

    On the web: www.prescottfarmersmarket.org


     

    in this issue

     

    CSA store specials

    health foods

    grapes, recipes and more!

     

    fresh this week

     

    carrots, salad turnips, okra, leeks, cherry tomatoes, winter squash, salad greens, and so much more!

     

    Plus:

    live music from Rita Cantu 

    upcoming events

    PRESCOTT FARMERS MARKET

    October 29: customer appreciation day &

    last day of the market!

    Every Saturday through October 29, 7:30-noon

    Yavapai College


    SUSTAINABLE FOOD PRESENTATIONS

    experiential series of events and lectures with Prescott College student Wren Myers. See attached flier for more info.

    - "The Power of Community" movie, Mariposa Bldg.

    October 18 5-7pm

    - A Sense of Self

    Prescott College Chapel

    October 27, 5-7pm

    - A Sense of Place

    Highlands Center

    November 5, 10am-12pm

    - A Sense of Community

    Highlands Center

    November 12, 10am-12pm

    - A Sense of Responsibility

    Prescott College Chapel

    November 17, 5-7pm


     

    28 September 2011

     
     

    this week in the CSA store...

    Don't forget the check our rotating selection of vegetables, dried fruit, pasta, eggs, and other locally produced goodies in the CSA store! All of these items are available for purchase Monday through Friday 8:30am-4:30pm, and until 6pm on Wednesdays! 

    This week's special: tomatoes from Jenner Farm in Skull Valley - only $2.50/lb! 

    We also have salad mix, goat cheese from a couple different producers, and bell peppers! 


    health foods

    Low fat, low sodium, low cholesterol, whole wheat, diet meals, fake meats, fortified...we've all fallen for the health claims made on many processed foods. We all know that whole foods are ideal for health, but sometimes it's difficult to decipher which foods are made from whole foods vs. those that are just pretending.


    As Michael Pollan says, (rules # 8, 9, and 10): "avoid...food products that make health claims...food products with the word "lite" or the terms "low fat" or "nonfat" in their names...and foods that are pretending to be something they are not". This runs counter to the wisdom many of us received from our mothers: my own health-conscious mother, for instance, is a huge fan of 1% milk and non-fat yogurt, but unfortunately they're full of extra additives to make them taste "fatty". Athletes often grab protein bars for quick energy, but the high fat and sugar provide only short bursts of energy that pack on the pounds in anyone not extremely active. And while many vegetarians proudly choose "fakin' bacon" over the real stuff, it's often full of preservatives, high amounts of sodium, and lots of unpronounceable ingredients. 


    Real food options include whole milk, ideally fresh from the farm or through a herdshare, and butter, yogurt and cheese made from this milk; home-made granola bars or trail mix, so you know exactly what's in it; and either real grass-fed meat or avoiding the meat altogether. In general, stick with the outside aisles at the grocery store and avoid the processed foods. Buy your produce, meat and snacks at the farmers markets and CSA, cook dinner at home and take the leftovers for lunch, and eat slowly and intentionally!


    Remember, real whole food doesn't need to make health claims. Produce is not represented by huge industry with lobbyists and paid advertising execs. Stick with the food who's ingredients you don't have to guess, and your body will thank you! 



    for more information:


    http://www.livestrong.com/slideshow/511209-the-worst-health-foods/#slide-1


    http://www.foodrenegade.com/michael-pollan-on-marketing-food/

     


     

    recipes…


    beef, okra, potato and carrot soup
    adapted from cookthink.com
    • 1/2 onion, diced
    • 2 ribs celery, thinly sliced
    • 1 medium carrot, thinly sliced
    • 3 tablespoons olive oil
    • 1 pound beef stew meat (chuck or round roast), cut into 1/2-inch cubes
    • 3/4 pound okra, cut into bite-sized pieces
    • 3 medium potatoes, cubed
    • 1/2 pound cherry tomatoes, cut in half
    • 5 cups water
    • 2 cloves garlic, minced
    • 1/2 cup finely chopped parsley
    • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
    Prep the onion, celery and carrot. Heat the olive oil in a large pot over medium heat. When the oil is hot, add the vegetables and season them with a generous sprinkling of salt and pepper. Cook, stirring occasionally, 8-10 minutes.

    Meanwhile, prep the beef, okra, potatoes and tomatoes. Season the beef generously all over with salt and pepper. Add these to the pot and stir. Cook, stirring occasionally, 4-6 more minutes.

    Add the water and bring the soup to a boil. Immediately reduce to a simmer. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the beef and potatoes are tender, 20-30 minutes. 

    Stir in the minced garlic, parsley and lemon juice. Add more salt and pepper to taste.

     

     

    Sep 10

    PFM newsletter 9/10

    Posted by: pfmadmin |
    Tagged in: Untagged 

    From the Land

    The Prescott Farmers Market and CSA Newsletter

    Contact us at info@prescottfarmersmarket.org or 928/713.1227

    Like us on Facebook: “Prescott Farmers Market and CSA

    On the web: www.prescott.edu/csa


     

    in this issue

     
     


     

    empty bowls

     

    delicata squash, recipes and more!

     

    fresh this week

     

    eggplant, roasted peppers, carrots, beets, tomatoes, and the season's first winter squash!

    Plus:

    local artist: Upcycling! Check out their beautiful glasses and bowls - made by hand all from used glass jars and bottles 

     

    veg of the week

     

    delicata squash: Cucurbita pepo

    The delicata squash is considered a "winter squash", meaning that it is harvested fully mature and eaten when the rind is hard (versus a summer squash, which is eaten when the skin is soft and edible). Interestingly, it is actually from the same family as summer squash! And similar to summer squash, it does not store as well as other winter squash.


    The delicata is also known as a peanut squash, Bohemian squash, or sweet potato squash as it has a similar taste to a sweet potato. They are native to North and Central America, where they were introduced by Native Americans to European settlers. 


    They are not as rich in beta-carotene as other winter squashes, but are a good source of dietary fiber, potassium, vitamin C and B, magnesium and manganese. 


    Delicatas, like other winter squashes, are most commonly baked and stuffed with meat, rice, or veggies. They can also be steamed, microwaved, sauteed, or peeled, chopped and added to soups. The seeds can also be toasted and eaten - yum! 

    upcoming events

     

    PRESCOTT FARMERS MARKET:

    Every Saturday through October 7:30-noon

    Yavapai College

     

    PRESCOTT VALLEY FARMERS MARKET:

    Every Tuesday through September 3-6pm

    Corner of Park Ave. and Glassford Hill

     

    CHINO VALLEY FARMERS MARKET

    Every Thursday through September 3-6pm

    BonnFire Grill Restaurant

     

    GROW NATIVE! PLANT SALE & EDUCATIONAL FESTIVAL

    Highlands Center for Natural History

    September 10


    EMPTY BOWLS

    Courthouse Square

    September 11 10:30-1pm

    $15

     

     
     

    10 September 2011

     
     


     

    empty bowls

    Hunger, the aching feeling in your belly when you haven't had enough to eat, can be defined in another way: the more chronic want or scarcity of food. In 2010, there were 925 million hungry people throughout the world - 925 million people that, on a regular basis, did not have enough food to meet basic nutritional requirements. That's 1 in 12 people. 500 million - mostly in Latin America, Asia and Africa, live in "absolute poverty" that results in absolute hunger. 


    The United States faces issues of malnutrition as well. Elderly people - at a rate of 1 in 6 - do not have an adequate diet. 1 in 8 American children under age 12 goes to bed hungry each night. 14% of households are food insecure, meaning that they limited or uncertain access to healthy food. 


    Ironically, this does not mean that the world does not produce enough food to feed everyone - there is enough food produced to provide every person on Earth with 2,720 calories per day! The problem lies instead with the complicated issues of food distribution. The primary problem is that many people in the world do not have sufficient land to grow or income to buy enough food. The relationship between hunger and poverty is complicated: poverty is caused by lack of resources, unequal income distribution, and conflict within a country. Poverty and hunger are reciprocally related, in that poverty causes hunger, which therefore causes poor health, low energy, and mental impairment, which in turn causes more poverty. 


    Recently, obesity is being viewed as another form of hunger, in which calorie-dense but nutritionally deficient foods comprise the majority of a person's diet. Obesity is also related to poverty, in that it primarily affects those with fewer resources and limited income, as cheaper foods tend to be higher in fat, sodium, and sugar. This form of malnutrition tends to affect the poor living in developed countries, where these cheaper forms of processed foods are readily available.


    So what can we do? As hopeless as it seems, we can all take action - and it's not by guilt-tripping our kids into finishing what's on their dinner plates (though that may at least have educational value!). Here are some ideas fromthe student-run thinkquest.org: governments of developed countries can help subsidize food purchases by hungry countries instead of domestic agribusiness. These same governments can reduce or forgive the debt owed by poor countries. We can support peace instead of war. We can support groups and politicians that hold these values. We can help educate people about the results of their actions, especially women and how overpopulation results in hunger. We can give food. We can reduce our own waste and encourage others to do the same (note that the percentage of food insecure households in the US is equal to the percentage of food that is wasted by the majority of households!) 


    There are countless organizations working to not only provide meals for the hungry, but to also make healthy food more affordable and accessible: Slow Food USA (who is currently in a membership drive!), Empty Bowls (Prescott's event is this Saturday!), the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (food stamps), WIC, and the National School Lunch program. 


    Particularly relevant this weekend: Empty Bowls is a nation-wide annual event in which local potters and artists make ceramic bowls, and local chefs donate their time and ingredients to make soup. The event is open to the public, and attendees pay $15 for a bowl and two portions of soup, that then goes to a local organization that fights hunger. The bowls are kept as reminders of the problem of world hunger, as well as one's contribution to helping solve the problem. This year, Empty Bowls in Prescott is occurring this Sunday, September 11 from 10:30am-1pm. In addition to many local restaurants and organizations, the Prescott Farmers Market will be there with an "Autumn Harvest Soup". Hope to see you there!


    For more information:

    http://www.worldhunger.org/

    http://library.thinkquest.org/C002291/high/present/stats.htm

    http://feedingamerica.org/

    http://www.emptybowls.net/

    http://www.slowfoodusa.org/

     
        

     

    recipes…

     

    Delicata Squash Pasta with Goat Cheese and Summer Beets

    Adapted from Carefree Cooking 

     

    • 4 red beets
    • 2 delicata squash, peeled and cut into quarters
    • 2 tablespoons olive oil, plus 1/4 cup
    • 1 pound penne pasta
    • 1 cup soft creamy Goat cheese
    • 1/2 cup grated Pecorino Romano cheese

     

     

     

    Preheat the oven to 425°. Trim the beets of stalks and tendrils; remove the outer skin with a vegetable peeler; cut into quarters; place in a large bowl. Add the cut delicata and then toss the squash and beets gently with the 2 tablespoons olive oil. Transfer to an oiled baking sheet. Bake 25 minutes or until the vegetables are tender when pierced with a fork.

    Meanwhile, cook the pasta according to package directions; drain and coat well with the 1/4 cup olive oil. Stir in the Goat and the Romano cheeses. Toss with the cooked vegetables and serve with more cheese sprinkled on top as garnish.

     

     

     

    Oven-Roasted Eggplant and Winter Squash Curry
    Adapted from food.com

     

    • lb eggplant
    • lbs winter squash
    • tablespoons canola oil
    • 2 1/2 teaspoons cumin seeds
    • 1 1/2 onions, diced
    • 1 1/2 tomatoes, in 1 1/2 inch dice
    • 1/4 teaspoon turmeric
    • 1/2 teaspoon ground fenugreek
    • 1/2 tablespoon ground coriander
    • 1/4 teaspoon ground pepper
    • 1/2 jalapeno pepper, chopped
    • 2 1/2 teaspoons salt
    • green onions, chopped in 1-inch pieces
    • 1/2 cup chopped fresh cilantro

     

     

     

  • Preheat oven to 450°F.

  • Wrap the eggplant and the squash individually in aluminum foil. Place them on a baking tray and bake them for 1 1/2 hours or until they are very soft. The eggplants will become mushy and deflated.

  • While the eggplant and squash are cooking, heat oil in large frying pan on medium-high heat for 1 minute. Add cumin seeds and allow them to sizzle for about 30 seconds. Stir in onions and saute until brown, 8 to 10 minutes.

  • Reduce heat to medium and stir in tomatoes. Add turmeric, fenugreek, coriander, black pepper, jalapeño pepper and salt. Cook this masala for 10 minutes. If the eggplant and squash are still cooking, remove the masala from the heat and set aside.

  • Remove eggplant and squash from the oven and cool for 5 to 10 minutes so you can unwrap the aluminum foil.

  • Using a pairing knife or potato peeler, peel the squash and discard the skin. Cut the squash in half. Using a spoon, scoop out the seeds from the squash. Cut in 1/2 inch cubes and place in mixing bowl.

  • Using your hands, peel the skin from the eggplant. Discard the skins. Add the eggplants to the mixing bowl.

  • Stir the eggplant and squash mixture into the masala. Turn the heat on to medium and cook, covered for 10 minutes. Just before serving, add the green onions and heat for 2 to 3 minutes. Remove from heat and stir in cilantro.

  • Serve as main dish with Chappatis (flatbread) or as a side dish.
  •  

     

     

     

    Crispy Roasted Shallots
    Adapted from myrecipes.com


    • - 12 shallots, peeled and quartered
    • - 1/4 cup olive oil
    • - 1 tablespoon chopped fresh rosemary
    • - Sea salt, to taste
    • - Freshly ground pepper, to taste

    Preheat oven to 400°. Place shallots in 8-inch square baking dish. Drizzle with oil, and sprinkle with remaining ingredients. Roast shallots at 400° for 20 minutes or until crispy and lightly browned, turning occasionally.


    Use roasted shallots alone as a side dish, add to mashed potatoes, blend with dijon mustard for a salad dressing, or with roasted garlic and olive oil on pizza!

    Sep 01

    This Saturday: Salsa Contest at the Prescott Farmers Market!

    Posted by: pfmadmin |
    Tagged in: Untagged 

    From the Land

    The Prescott Farmers Market and CSA Newsletter

    Contact us at info@prescottfarmersmarket.org or 928/713.1227

    Like us on Facebook: “Prescott Farmers Market and CSA

     

    In this issue

     

    CSA Fall Share

    seasonal food

    peppers, recipes and more!

     

    Fresh this week

     

    radishes, head lettuce, tomatillos, onions, anaheim/jalepeno/ poblano/bell peppers, garlic, melons, and so much more! Plus:

     

    SALSA CONTEST! Bring your entry to the Information Booth by 8am - or stop by for a taste test and to vote!

     

    Music by Traditional Blends

     

    Guest artisan: Kevin Kemsey and the "Avo-Loop": www.avoloop.com 

     

    Veg of the Week

     

    pepper: Capsicum spp.

     

    Peppers of all varieties (poblanos, anaheims, jalepenos, bells, banana peppers) belong to the Capsicum genus of the nightshade family, and are therefore related to tomatoes, eggplants, and potatoes. There is no relation with black pepper, Piper negrum, but the common name refers to the spicy taste. They are native to the Americas and have been cultivated since 3000 BC. Peppers are now a common ingredient throughout the world, from Africa to South America to India to Europe. 


    The spicy flavor in many peppers comes from capsaicin, the plant's natural defense against pests and birds. The levels of capsaicin depend on both genetics and environment, which makes the heat in peppers and chiles extremely variable. The only kind of capsicum without any capsaicin is the bell pepper!


    Capsaicin, as well as adding spice, has many health benefits:

    - It cools the body, by tricking it into feeling hotter than it is. Our regulating mechanisms then kick into overdrive!

    - It helps moderate caloric intake, as it signals to our brain that we are full. In addition, it boosts metabolism.

    - It may help fight against certain cancers

    - It is a natural analgesic (painkiller) 

    - It clears the sinuses


    Peppers can be eaten raw or cooked. They can be sliced in salads, cooked in stir-fries, sliced and fried, roasted, chopped into salsas or salads, dried, pickled, frozen, or extracted into hot sauces. No matter what your heat preference, eat up - now's the season for peppers!

    Upcoming Events

     

    PRESCOTT FARMERS MARKET:

    September 3:

    Salsa Contest! Bring your entry by 8am and stop by to taste and vote!

    Music by Traditional Blends

    Guest Artisan: Kevin Kemsey and the "AvoLoop": www.avoloop.com

    Every Saturday through October 7:30-noon

    Yavapai College

     

    PRESCOTT VALLEY FARMERS MARKET:

    Every Tuesday through September 3-6pm

    Corner of Park Ave. and Glassford Hill

     

    CHINO VALLEY FARMERS MARKET

    Every Thursday through September 3-6pm

    BonnFire Grill Restaurant

     

    GROW NATIVE! PLANT SALE & EDUCATIONAL FESTIVAL

    Highlands Center for Natural History

    September 10

     

     

     
     

    1 September 2011

     
     

    Salsa Contest this Saturday!

    Highlight your best homemade salsa for a chance to win market tokens! Bring your entries, labeled and in a serving container, to the Information Booth by 8am this Saturday. Stop back by for a taste test and to vote! Votes will be tallied and the winner will be notified after the market. 

     

    Last chance for CSA Fall Share!

    The Fall CSA is filling up fast! To get weekly shares of locally grown produce through December 14, fill out and e-mail in the contract: www.prescott.edu/assets/documents/pdf-csa-fallshare-contract.pdf. All contracts are due tomorrow!

     

    seasonal food

    CSAs and farmers markets are full of buzzwords like "local", "heirloom", and "seasonal". Have you stopped to think about what these words mean? LOCAL, for starters, is defined differently by every person or organization that uses it. Our Prescott Farmers Market defines it as "within Yavapai County" (for produce) and "within Arizona" for processed food ingredients. The Prescott College CSA defines local as "within 100 mile radius of Prescott". New Frontiers defines it as what can be shipped to the store within a single day. What do you think of as "local"? Do you try to incorporate a certain percentage of local food into your diet or put an emphasis on sourcing local food? Are you willing to spend more on local food because you know that it's been raised responsibly by a small farmer, or by someone that you know? 

    SEASONAL is often mistakenly interchanged with LOCAL, and though "local" is by definition "seasonal", its meaning is very different. Seasonal refers to the season in which an item is produced and is at its peak, either in harvest or flavor. This of course means different produce items depending on location: August means broccoli and peas in North Dakota, blackberries and blueberries in Washington, avocados and mangos in Florida, and white corn and okra in Arizona! Eating locally - and therefore seasonally - can require a different mindset regarding meal planning when our week's meals. You can see what's in season when you go to the farmers market or pick up your CSA share, and there are also some online tools to help you know what you might find there before you go.  Check out epicurious.com's seasonal food map (http://www.epicurious.com/articlesguides/seasonalcooking/farmtotable/ seasonalingredientmap) for the "short list" of what's available, and also for cooking tips and recipes for each item. You'll have somewhere to turn next time you end up with tomatillos and don't know what to do with them, or maybe discover an item you'll want to seek out at the market!


     
        

     

    Recipes…

     

    Roasted Tomatillo Chile Salsa

    Adapted from foodrepublic.com

     

     

    • 1 lb tomatillos
    • 2 green chiles, anaheim or poblano, seeded and charred
    • 2 jalapenos, seeded and deveined
    • 2 cloves garlic, rough chopped
    • 1/2 cube bouillon
    • 1/4 C rice wine vinegar
    • 1 t sesame oil
    • 1/3 C cilantro, roughly chopped
    • 1 t salt

    Remove husks from tomatillos and rinse. Then, quarter.

    Rough chop both chiles and place in food processor along with tomatillos and garlic. Pulse lightly until coarse texture is achieved.

    Place in a saucepan, add bouillon cube and vinegar and oil. Simmer for 15 minutes or until tomatillos are quite soft. Cool. Season with salt and add cilantro just prior to serving.

     

     

     

    Corn Radish Salad with Chile Jalapeno Dressing

    Adapted from whatscookingamerica.net

     

     

    • 4 ears corn, husked
    • 10-12 radishes, thinly sliced
    • 1/2 C thinly sliced onion
    • 1/2 C coarsely chopped cilantro leaves
    • 1 jalapeno, seeded and coarsely chopped
    • 3 T fresh-squeezed lime juice
    • 3 t honey
    • 3 T olive oil
    • 1/2 t salt

    Scrape the corn kernels from the ears of corn by using a sharp kitchen knife and a large cutting board. Cut off the stem end to give a flat base. Hold the ear, tip end up, then cut downward, removing a few rows at a time. Place cut-off corn kernels in a large bowl. Add sliced radishes, diced onion, and cilantro leaves; set aside.

    In a blender, puree the chile pepper, lime juice, honey, and olive oil. Add lime juice mixture to the bowl with the corn kernels. Season to taste with salt.

    Refrigerate the salad until approximately 1/2 hour before serving. Just before serving, toss in the fresh basil. Taste for seasonings and serve cold or at room temperature.

     

     

    Stuffed Peppers

    Adapted from allrecipes.com

     

    •  
      • 1 lb ground beef or turkey
      • 1/2 C uncooked long-grain brown rice
      • 1 C water
      • 6 green bell peppers
      • 2 C tomato sauce
      • 1 T Worcestershire sauce
      • 1/4 t garlic powder
      • 1/4 t onion powder
      • salt and pepper to taste
      • 1 t Italian seasoning (or mix of oregano, basil, marjoram, rosemary, and thyme

     

    1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F 
    2. Place the rice and water in a saucepan, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat, cover, and cook 20 minutes. In a skillet over medium heat, cook the beef until evenly browned.
    3. Remove and discard the tops, seeds, and membranes of the bell peppers. Arrange peppers in a baking dish with the hollowed sides facing upward. (Slice the bottoms of the peppers if necessary so that they will stand upright.)
    4. In a bowl, mix the browned beef, cooked rice, 1 can tomato sauce, Worcestershire sauce, garlic powder, onion powder, salt, and pepper. Spoon an equal amount of the mixture into each hollowed pepper. Mix the remaining tomato sauce and Italian seasoning in a bowl, and pour over the stuffed peppers.
    5. Bake 1 hour in the preheated oven, basting with sauce every 15 minutes, until the peppers are tender.
    Aug 25

    photo contest deadline reminder

    Posted by: pfmadmin |
    Tagged in: Untagged 

    This weekend is the last chance to snap those beautiful pictures of the Prescott Farmers Market! Anyone can enter, and all photos are due August 31st!

    The top 15 will be posted on the website, and the top 3 photographers will receive market bucks to use at any of the three local farmers markets!

    Send your entries to info@prescottfarmersmarket.org 

    Aug 25

    PFM newsletter 8/25

    Posted by: pfmadmin |
    Tagged in: Untagged 
     

     

    From the Land

    The Prescott Farmers Market and CSA Newsletter

    Contact us at info@prescottfarmersmarket.org or 928/713.1227

    Like us on Facebook: “Prescott Farmers Market and CSA

     

    In this issue

     

    CSA reminders

    food rule #3

    okra, recipes and more!

     

    Fresh This Week

     

    okra, roasted peppers, corn, cucumbers, tomatoes, all kinds of summer squash, melons and grapes, and so much more!

     

    Plus:

     

    live music with Cat and Chuck

    guest artist John Ryszka 

     

    Veg of the Week

     

    Okra: Abelmoschus esculentus

     

    images.jpegOkra - also known as "lady's fingers", bhendi, bamya, and the more general "gumbo" - is native to West Africa. Its wild ancestry is unknown, and it may be a cultigen - artifically selected by humans, rather than naturally selected for certain characteristics. One of the earliest written accounts of okra was in 1216 by a Spanish Moor visiting Egypt. It was introduced to the Americas by slaves from Africa.

     

     


    As anyone who has eaten okra knows, it is very mucilaginous, which is further enhanced by cooking. It can be somewhat decreased by cooking the okra pods whole, quickly stir-frying them on high heat, cooking okra with acidic ingredients such as tomatoes, lemon juice, or vinegar, or slicing and cooking for a long time so the mucilage cooks off, as in gumbo. 


    The mucilage in okra contains high amounts of usable soluble fiber - so eat up! It is commonly eaten breaded and fried, or in many Southern dishes like gumbo and jambalaya. 


    Store it in the refrigerator in a paper bag or wrapped in a paper towel inside a perforated plastic bag. To freeze it, blanch it for 2 minutes then freeze for up to 12 months. Cooked okra can be stored in the refrigerator for 3 or 4 days.

     

    Upcoming Events

     

    PRESCOTT FARMERS MARKET:

    August 27:

    Music by Cat and Chuck

    Guest Artist: John Ryszka

    Every Saturday through October 7:30-noon

    Yavapai College

     

    PRESCOTT VALLEY FARMERS MARKET:

    Every Tuesday through September 3-6pm

    Corner of Park Ave. and Glassford Hill

     

    CHINO VALLEY FARMERS MARKET

    Every Thursday through September 3-6pm

    BonnFire Grill Restaurant

     

    PFM PHOTOS DUE

    August 31

    Send in your favorite photos of the farmers market toinfo@prescottfarmersmarket.org

    Winners posted on website and top three win market bucks!


    PFM SALSA CONTEST:

    Saturday, September 3rd

    Bring your entry in a serving dish, with a spoon and label, to the Information Booth by 8am. Stop by throughout the day for a taste-test and to vote! The winner will receive 50 market bucks!

     

    GROW NATIVE! PLANT SALE & EDUCATIONAL FESTIVAL

    Highlands Center for Natural History

    September 10

     
     

    25 August 2011

     
     

    PCCSA reminders

    You can continue receiving fresh local produce year-round through our Community Supported Agriculture program! We're a multi-farm CSA that supports many of your favorite vendors from the Prescott Farmers Market, distributing produce shares each week through our local foods store in the Prescott College Bookstore at 371 Garden St! You can find more information and the contract at www.prescott.edu/csa. Make sure you get your CSA contracts in by August 31st for the Fall Share, which begins September 7th! 

    And - make sure you check out our ever-growing selection of local food goodies in the CSA store!

     

    food rule #3: Avoid food products containing ingredients that no ordinary human would keep in the pantry. 

    High fructose corn syrup. Brominated vegetable oil. Benzoate preservatives. Sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite. Partially hydrogenated oil. Monosodium glutamate. What is that stuff? Not only is it difficult for the average person to decipher what those ingredients actually are (definitely not ingredients you'd find laying around!), they are also the tell-tale sign of processed foods - and no, I'm not talking about pickles. Processed foods, with or without health claims, can be some of the most dangerous items to put into our bodies because of their high content of sodium, sugar, fat, and preservatives.


    Another danger is that  the source of many ingredients are close to impossible to decipher, a danger for those with allergies or sensitivities. Dr. Sears writes:


    The ingredients list tells you, usually in fine print, what ingredients the food contains. These are listed in order, starting with the ingredient found in the largest amount, by weight, and progressing to the ingredient present in the smallest amount. The ingredients list may be the most important information on the box to someone with food allergies or to a parent wary of the effect of food colors or preservatives on a child's behavior. Here you can find out if a food contains eggs, soy, milk, corn, or whatever you must avoid eating. It's important, even critical, to know the lingo. Casein, caseinate, lactalbumin, whey or whey solids are all derived from cow's milk, though their names don't reveal this. Albumin comes from eggs. Dextrose and glucose may originate in corn. Hydrolyzed vegetable protein starts with soybeans, and some of the products used to thicken or stabilize food texture, such as acacia gum, are legume products.  


    In addition, most corn and soy products in processed foods are genetically modified, the exception being those that specifically state that they are "certified organic", which prohibits the use of GMOs. In short - know what you're putting in your body by sourcing whole and "real food" ingredients and making your snacks and desserts yourself. Your body will thank you!


    For more info:

    http://www.living-a-healthy-lifestyle.com/dangerous-food-ingredients.html

    http://www.askdrsears.com/topics/family-nutrition/food-labels/how-read-package-label

    http://webecoist.com/2009/05/08/10-weird-and-gross-ingredients-in-processed-food/

     
      

     

        

     

    Recipes…

     

    Okra with Tomato and Cucumber

    Adapted from khanapakana.com

     

     

    • 3/4 lb okra
    • 2 T sunflower oil
    • 2 T mustard seeds
    • 2 whole dried red chilies
    • 1 onion, sliced
    • 2 small tomatoes, chopped
    • 1 small cucumber, chopped
    • 1 garlic clove, chopped
    • 1 t fresh ginger, grated
    • 1/2 t turmeric
    • salt
    • coconut, grated, to sprinkle

     

     

    Slice the okra diagonally into 1/2" slices. 


    Heat the oil in a large frying pan, and when hot, add mustard seeds. As they begin to pop, add the dried red chilies and onion. Stir-fry over medium heat for 4-5 min or until the onion softens, then stir in the tomatoes, cucumber, garlic, ginger, and turmeric. Stir-fry for another 3-4 minutes.


    Turn heat to high and add the okra. Stir-fry 2-3 minutes, add the seasonings and take off heat. 


    Sprinkle on the grated coconut and serve immediately.

     

     

    Corn, Black Bean and Tomato Stuffed Pattypan Squash

    Adapted from fortunavirilis.blogspot.com

     

     

    • 3 large pattypan squash
    • 1 Tbsp olive oil
    • 1 onion, diced
    • 3 garlic cloves, minced
    • 1 1/2 cups cooked black beans (or 1 can, drained and rinsed)
    • 2 ears corn, kernels cut off
    • 3 medium tomatoes, chopped
    • 1 Tbsp cumin
    • 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper
    • salt to taste
    • 1/4 cup shredded mozzarella cheese

     

     

    Put the squash in a large pot with about 1 inch of water.  Cover pot, bring water to a boil, and let the squash steam until they begin to get tender (about 7 min).  Remove squash from pot and let them cool.  Once they've cooled, cut off stems and scoop out as much of the inside of each squash as possible.  Roughly chop the scooped out squash and set it aside.

    Heat oil over medium heat in a large skillet.  Saute onion until it's tender, and then add garlic and cook for an additional minute.  Stir in chopped squash, beans, corn, tomatoes, and spices and cook for a few minutes.  Place the squash shells into a large baking dish and stuff them with the bean mixture. Top each squash with a pinch of cheese.  You will likely have tons of the bean mixture left, so pour this into the dish around the squash shells or bake it in a separate dish.  Bake at 350 for 20 min.  Serves 5.

     

    Pickled Okra

    Adapted from foodnetwork.com

     

    •  
      • 2 pounds young, small to medium okra pods
      • 4 small dried chiles, split in 1/2
      • 2 teaspoons mustard seeds
      • 12 sprigs fresh dill
      • 4 cloves garlicwhole
      • 1 teaspoon whole peppercorns
      • 1/4 cup kosher salt
      • 2 cups rice wine vinegar
      • 2 cups bottled water
      • Special Equipment: 4 pint-sized canning jars, sterilized*

     

    Wash the okra and trim the stem to 1/2-inch. Place 1 chile, 1/2 teaspoon mustard seeds, 3 sprigs of dill, 1 clove of garlic and 1/4 teaspoon peppercorns in the bottom of each of 4 sterilized pint canning jars. Divide the okra evenly among the 4 jars, standing them up vertically, alternating stems up and down.

    In a medium saucepan over medium heat, bring the salt, vinegar and water to a boil. Once boiling, pour this mixture over the okra in the jars, leaving space between the top of the liquid and the lid. Seal the lids. Set in a cool dry place for 2 weeks.

     

    *Tips on Sterilizing Jars

    Properly-handled sterilized equipment will keep canned foods in good condition for years. Sterilizing jars is the first step of preserving foods.

    Sterilizing Tips:

    Jars should be made from glass and free of any chips or cracks. Preserving or canning jars are topped with a glass, plastic, or metal lid, which has a rubber seal. Two piece lids are best for canning, as they vacuum seal when processed.

    To sterilize jars, before filling with jams, pickles, or preserves, wash jars and lids with hot, soapy water. Rinse well and arrange jars and lids open sides up, without touching, on a tray. Boil the jars and lids in a large saucepan, covered with water, for 15 minutes.

    Use tongs when handling the hot sterilized jars, to move them from boiling water. Be sure the tongs are sterilized too, by dipping the ends in boiling water for a few minutes.

    As a rule, hot preserves go into hot jars and cold preserves go into cold jars. All items used in the process of making jams, jellies, and preserves must be clean. This includes any towels used, and especially your hands.

    After the jars are sterilized, you can preserve the food. It is important to follow any canning and processing instructions included in the recipe and refer to USDA guidelines about the sterilization of canned products.

    Aug 12

    PFM newsletter 8/12

    Posted by: pfmadmin |
    Tagged in: Untagged 

     

    From the Land

    The Prescott Farmers Market and CSA Newsletter

    Contact us at info@prescottfarmersmarket.org or 928/713.1227

    Like us on Facebook: “Prescott Farmers Market and CSA

     

    In this issue

     
     

    CSA sign-up

     

    PFM photo contest

     

    Farmers Market Week

     

    Fresh this week

     

    Garlic, onions, green onions, banana peppers, tomatoes, summer squash, cucumbers, corn, watermelon, and so much more! Plus:

    live music from Frontier Medicine - check out their music at www.yvonneholland.com 

    guest artist: Pat Mass with her crystal jewelry

    landscaping info with Barnabus Kane 

     

    Veg of the Week

     

    Corn: Zea mays

    Corn – or maize – was domesticated by indigenous peoples in Mesoamerica thousands of years ago, making it among the world’s oldest crops. It is a far cry from its presumed ancestor, teosinte, which looks like a grass, and maize’s domestication has been a topic of interest among genetic researchers, archeologists, and ethnobotanists for years. It spread widely around 1500 BC, and was a staple food for most pre-Colombian North American, Mesoamerican, South American, and Caribbean cultures. Since being introduced  by the Portugese in the 16th century, it has also become a staple food items in Africa. It is one of the “Three Sisters” – corn, beans, and squash – that were planted together by Native American custom, as each plant provides structural support, soil nutrients or shade for the other two. Corn is now the most commonly grown crop in the US (40% of the world’s harvest), of which most is grown for livestock feed. There is growing concern over these hybrid and GM varieties replacing traditional strains historically grown in Mexico and Central America.

     

    Corn is eaten as a grain (like in tortillas) and as a vegetable (like sweet corn). High fructose corn syrup is (chemically) extracted from corn, as is corn oil, corn starch, and ethanol.  Sweet corn, selected for high sugar content and low starch, is actually harvested and eaten while still premature.

     

    One of the most common corn pests is the corn ear worm. It can be treated conventionally through pesticides, but organic growers have a more difficult time controlling the little worms that like to munch on the end of the ear. You’ll find tomorrow’s CSA corn with the ends chopped off so you don’t have to worry about dealing with the little creature! But even if you do, would you rather deal with pesticides or a harmless corn ear worm? Yep, that’s what I thought…

     

    Upcoming Events

     

    PRESCOTT FARMERS MARKET:

    August 13:

    Music by Frontier Medicine

    Jewelry by Pat Mass

    Landscaping info with Barnabus Kane

    Every Saturday through October 7:30-noon

    Yavapai College

     

    PRESCOTT VALLEY FARMERS MARKET:

    Every Tuesday through September 3-6pm

    Corner of Park Ave. and Glassford Hill

     

    CHINO VALLEY FARMERS MARKET

    Every Thursday through September 3-6pm

    BonnFire Grill Restaurant

     

    FROM THE LAND TO THE LANDFILL

    August 16

    3-5pm: student presentations on the Prescott areas’ food system – Crossroads Community Room

    5-5:30pm: campus gardens tour

     

    FARMAGEDDON the movie: The Unseen War on Family Farms

    Saturday, August 20th 7-9pm

    Sedona Public Library

    Carpooling available

    More info attached

     

    PFM PHOTOS DUE

    August 31

    Send in your favorite photos of the farmers market to info@prescottfarmersmarket.org

    Winners posted on website and top three photographers win market bucks!

     

    GROW NATIVE! PLANT SALE & EDUCATIONAL FESTIVAL

    Highlands Center for Natural History

    September 10

     
     
     

    12 August 2011

     
     

    CSA Fall Share sign-up

    The Prescott College Community Supported Agriculture is now accepting new members for the Fall Share! The PCCSA is a year-round membership-based local food program, in which members sign up for a season (or full year) of weekly distributed vegetables - all from your favorite local farmers! The share options include produce, dairy herdshares, beef, and another opportunity to purchase scrip for the Prescott Farmers Markets. The produce to expect in the Fall Share is extremely varied: from summer squash and sweet peppers to okra and salad greens, brassicas and root veggies. We’ll even get fruit from Jerome or Kirkland, and citrus from Phoenix! New this season: pay in advance and get a $20 discount! Please contact us at pccsa@prescott.edu for the contract or more information!

    Photo Contest

    Our photo contest was extended, but the deadline is quickly approaching! Grab those cameras and bring them to the farmers market - pictures of vendors, veggies, the whole market, anything you like, can be sent in to info@prescottfarmersmarket.org. The top 15 will be posted on the website, and the top 3 will receive market tokens to spend at any of our three farmers markets! Submissions due August 31st! 

    National Farmers Market Week

    It’s National Farmers Market Week! Since first declared by the USDA in 2000, the number of US farmers markets has almost tripled – from 2,863 in 2000 to 7,175 in 2011! Why does this matter? It matters because there are more markets through which farmers can sell their goods, making farming a viable income source and lifestyle. It means that there are more ways that customers can source high quality produce, closer to home, making healthy food more affordable and accessible. And it means that communities – both urban and rural – are becoming stronger as community members keep more money in the local economy by supporting local businesses, and “put their money where their mouth is” by essentially voting for the kind of food system they want to support.

    What kind of food system do YOU want to support? I want to support one in which farmers earn a livable wage growing food for their communities, and in which all people have access to healthy food. I want to support a system that preserves heirloom seeds, and in which farm animals are raised humanely. One that exposes me to new foods, new varieties, and encourages me to be creative in the kitchen. And one that makes me want to share food with friends, and makes me want to celebrate food and food culture!

     
     

     

       

     

           

     

    Recipes…

     

    Baked Stuffed Banana Peppers

    Adapted from cdkitchen.com

     

    ·         6 banana peppers, hot or sweet

    ·         ½ pound ground beef

    ·         ½ onion, finely chopped

    ·         1 ear corn

    ·         1/2 cup Swiss cheese, shredded

    ·         1/4 teaspoon black pepper

    ·         1 egg

    ·         1/3 cup flour

     

    Wash and clean peppers, cut off top and small part of bottom of peppers. 
    Saute ground beef and onions until meat is browned on surface. Stir in corn, then cheese. Stuff mixture into peppers. 
    Whisk egg in bowl. Dip peppers in egg. Roll in flour, dip again and roll in flour again. 
    Place in baking dish and spray surface with non-stick vegetable oil spray until flour in moistened. 
    Bake in pre-heated 350 degrees F oven until cheese is melted and coating begins to brown, about 20 minutes.

     

     

    Zucchini, Tomato, and Corn Salad

    Adapted from epicurious.com

     

    ·         1 lb zucchini

    ·         1 1/4 teaspoons salt

    ·         1 cup fresh corn kernels (cut from 2 ears)

    ·         2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

    ·         1/2 teaspoon sugar

    ·         1/4 teaspoon black pepper

    ·         1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil

    ·         8 ounces grape or cherry tomatoes, halved lengthwise or 2 cups larger tomatoes in wedges

    ·         1/4 cup thinly sliced fresh basil

     

    Working with 1 zucchini at a time, cut lengthwise into very thin (julienne) strips with slicer, turning zucchini and avoiding core. Compost core.

     

    Toss zucchini strips with 1 teaspoon salt and let drain in a colander set over a bowl, covered and chilled, 1 hour.

     

    Gently squeeze handfuls of zucchini to remove excess water and pat dry with paper towels.

     

    Cook corn in a small saucepan of boiling water until tender, about 3 minutes. Drain, then rinse under cold water and pat dry.

     

    Whisk together lemon juice, sugar, pepper, and remaining 1/4 teaspoon salt in a large bowl, then add oil in a slow stream, whisking. Add zucchini, corn, tomatoes, and basil and toss well.

     

     

    Potato-Cucumber Soup with Toasted Corn

    Adapted from rachelraymag.com

     

    ·         1 T olive oil

    ·         1 onion, chopped

    ·         1 lb. potatoes, cubed

    ·         2 C chicken or vegetable broth

    ·         1 lb. cucumbers, chopped

    ·         ¼ C heavy cream

    ·         1 ear corn, husked

    ·         ½ C flat-leaf parsley

    ·         Salt and pepper

     

    In a large pot, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the onion; cook until slightly softened. Add the potatoes, chicken broth and 1 1/2 cups water. Bring to a simmer, cover and cook until the potatoes are tender, about 15 minutes. Using a food processor, and working in batches, puree the potato mixture with the cucumber. Return to the pot and stir in the cream.

     

    Heat a heavy skillet over medium-high heat. Add the corn and cook until golden, about 5 minutes. Scrape off the corn kernels; add to the soup. Stir in the parsley; season with salt and pepper. For cold soup, refrigerate until chilled.

     

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